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Romania: President Klaus Iohannis appoints former MEP Ramona Mănescu as the new Foreign Affairs Minister

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President Klaus Iohannis signed on Wednesday the decrees appointing Nicolae Moga as Interior Minister and Ramona Mănescu as Foreign Affairs Minister, according to a Presidential Administration release.

Furthermore, Iohannis took note of Carmen Dan’s resignation from the Interior Ministry and signed the decree dismissing Teodor Melescanu from the Foreign Affairs Minister office.

Through another decree, Mihai Fifor was appointed Deputy Prime Minister for implementing Romania’s strategic partnerships.

The swearing-in ceremony takes place on Wednesday at 11:00hrs, at the Cotroceni Presidential Palace. 

Ramona Mănescu is a Romanian politician and lawyer. She was a Member of the European Parliament serving 2007 to 2013 and 2014 to 2019 from the National Liberal Party (till July 2017), active within the European People’s Party group in the European Parliament.

As part of this group she is a member of the European Parliament Committee on Foreign Affairs, vice-chair in the Delegation for relations with the Mashreq countries and a substitute member in the Committee on transport and tourism and in Delegation for relations with the Arab Peninsula.

Between 2007 and 2014 she was part of the ALDE group in the European Parliament, where she also held the position of Vice-President (11 November 2012 – June 2014) of the ALDE Party (Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe Party). As a member of this group she is a coordinator in the Regional Development Committee and a member in the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs.

At the European Parliamentary elections from June 2014, Mănescu renewed her mandate within European Parliament, where she became a member of the European People’s Party group in the Parliament European.

Robert Lupițu este redactor-șef, specialist în relații internaționale, jurnalist în afaceri europene și doctorand în domeniul reasigurării strategice a NATO. Robert este laureat al concursului ”Reporter și Blogger European” la categoria Editorial și co-autor al volumelor ”România transatlantică” și ”100 de pași pentru o cetățenie europeană activă”. Face parte din Global Shapers Community, o inițiativă World Economic Forum, și este Young Strategic Leader în cadrul inițiativelor The Aspen Institute. Din 2019, Robert este parte a programului #TT27 Leadership Academy organizat de European Political Strategy Center, think tank-ul Comisiei Europene.

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#EPPLocalDialogue: ”From Brain drain to Brain gain” – hosted by Emil Boc, Mayor of Cluj-Napoca. What are the key issues and future solutions for the young generations

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© EPP CoR- Twitter

Emil Boc, Mayor of Cluj-Napoca and member of the European Committee of the Regions, hosted in Brussels the debate ”From Brain drain to Brain gain”.

This EPP Local Dialogue looked into what the EU can do for its citizens to transform ‘brain drain’ into a ‘brain gain’ – an opportunity for both the receiving communities and the places of origin.

During the debate the audience has exhanged views with Dubravka Šuica, (EPP/HR), Commissioner-designate responsible for Democracy and Demography will also atend the event, Rafał Trzaskowski, Mayor of Warsaw, EPP CoR Member Esther de Lange, (EPP/NL), Member of the European Parliament, Vice-president of the EPP Group, Isabel Benjumea Benjumea, Member of the European Parliament, REGI Vice-Chair

First Part

Second Part

The debate was moderated by Dan Carbunaru Calea Europeana.

This event has been broadcasted LIVE on CaleaEuropeană.ro and on Calea Europeană Facebook Page on December 5th.

 

Emil Boc, Mayor of Cluj-Napoca – Brain drain is becoming more and more important for the European Union

© Calea Europeană


© EPP CoR- Twitter

 

Brain drain is becoming more and more important for the European Union and if we are not going to discuss to tackle and to find common solutions together, these brain drain can affect, even the future of the European project. There is no magical solutions. We have to work together and everyone has to do their own job first. Working in partnership with European Union, we have the best content in order to tackle the brain drain problem. 

In his presentation, Emil Boc referred to Cluj-Napoca, ”the most friendly city in Europe with foreign citizens” that tries to improve the quality of life day by day.

 


Dubravka Šuica,  Commissioner-designate responsible for Democracy and Demography – ”brain drain” is one of the key issues that I intend to focus on in the next five years

© Calea Europeană


© EPP CoR – Twitter

 

”As the commissioner in charge of demography, brain drain is one of the key issues that I intend to focus on in the next five years. Brain drain phenomenon, really can pause the European Union. We have to think about measures which we can put in place to retain attract or regain a highly educated workforce, because local authorities are the ones most affected with the consequences of the brain drain. In order to tackle the ”brain drain”, we need tailor-made solutions to attract, and retain the workforce and reduce disparities across the EU. Cohesion funds play a crucial role in supporting regions to cope with #braindrain and creating social & economic stability for the citizens.”

 


 

Esther de Lange, (EPP/NL), Member of the European Parliament, Vice-president of the EPP Group – We need to focus on providing a good quality of life as a reason to return

© Calea Europeana


© Esther de Lange – Twitter

 

”We are focusing very much now on the issue of brain drain and brain gain between countries within the EU, but of course there’s an underlying challenge that we have as an EU as a whole. I think it’s so incredibly important that not only we have a vice president thatis dealing with demography, and democracy in the link between the two. We need to focus on providing a good quality of life as a reason to return, concept of smart villages – based on the right infrastructure, telemedicine, 5G – can help keep people in our rural areas.”

 


 

Rafał Trzaskowski, Mayor of Warsaw – Brain drain, one of the biggest nightmares that we have to confront 

© Calea Europeana

 


”Brain drain sounds dramatic and  sounds like one of the biggest nightmares that we have to confront. When you look at the brain drain and the people who emigrate in the past two years to Britain they are highly qualified and of course, we’ve heard about doctors, nurses, and so on. We all do have these problems, but to be absolutely honest with you, the problem is also internal.”

© EPP CoR-Twitter

 

How to deal brain drain?

”Obviously focusing on the things which are most important for the people, which is, most of all, the infrastructure and the quality of life, because that’s what the people expect right now.”


 

 

Isabel Benjumea Benjumea, Member of the European Parliament, REGI Vice-Chair – Competition between countries and regions is natural. More focus on brain gain

© Calea Europeana


“Competition between countries and regions is natural; people moving around Europe can make our Union stronger and more united. I’m afraid I’m going to be the only one that I don’t see this as a dramatic situation. I know that cities have to compete, and I know that regions have to compete.  It has always happened in order to go to the cities where you have more opportunities where you can have a better quality of life.

© EPP CoR- Twitter

Of course people always look for the best, and it’s good that cities and member states and regions to compete among themselves to see which is more attractive, and I think that’s something good. We need to be an open European Union to keep the best people living in different places. So, I truly believe we’re looking at from the wrong perspective.”


 

 

Brain drain – the loss of an educated and skilled workforce – is a challenge affecting local communities and regions, but also member states and the European Union as a whole.

In 2017, approximately 4.2 million EU citizens aged between 15 and 64 with a tertiary education were residing in an EU country other than their country of citizenship. Every citizen is concerned: from the worker in constructions to researchers who are able to move within the EU. 

EPP Local Dialogues are a series of events organised across Europe, bringing citizens and EPP leaders together to discuss European policies of local interest and gathering people’s expectations on the ground.

Also on CaleaEuropeană.ro: Opinion in SEDEC Commission on “Brain drain in the EU: addressing the challenge at all levels”, presented by Emil Boc, was unanimous adopted

 

 

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”From Brain drain to Brain gain” – #EPPLocalDialogue in Brussels will be hosted by Emil Boc Mayor of Cluj-Napoca on Thursday, 5 December

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© EPP Group CoR/ Twitter

Emil Boc, Mayor of Cluj-Napoca and a member of the European Committee of the Regions, will host in Brussels the debate ”From Brain drain to Brain gain”.

Emil Boc, Mayor of Cluj-Napoca (EPP/RO) is also the CoR rapporteur on Brain drain in the EU: addressing the challenge at all levels

Esther de Lange, (EPP/NL), Member of the European Parliament, Vice-president of the EPP Group and Dubravka Šuica, (EPP/HR), Commissioner-designate responsible for Democracy and Demography will also atend the event.

Open debate with the audience will be moderated by Dan Carbunaru Calea Europeana.

This event will be broadcasted LIVE on CaleaEuropeană.ro and on Calea Europeană Facebook Page on December 5th  starting at 16h30.

© epp.cor.europa.eu

Brain drain – the loss of an educated and skilled workforce – is a challenge affecting local communities and regions, but also member states and the European Union as a whole. In 2017, approximately 4.2 million EU citizens aged between 15 and 64 with a tertiary education were residing in an EU country other than their country of citizenship. Every citizen is concerned: from the worker in constructions to researchers who are able to move within the EU. However, they should do this because they want it, and not because they are pushed by poverty, limited working opportunities or a lack of possibilities to express their talents.

This EPP Local Dialogue will look into what the EU can do for its citizens to transform ‘brain drain’ into a ‘brain gain’ – an opportunity for both the receiving communities and the places of origin.

Participants will have the chance to share their real-life stories on brain drain in an open dialogue with their regional and local elected politicians, as well as with representatives from the European Parliament and the European Commission. The aim is to share experiences on how local and regional authorities can tackle brain drain in their areas, while identifying needs and resources to cope with the phenomenon also at national and EU levels. The event will be web streamed and followed by a networking session.

Interpretation will be provided in English and French.

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Ursula von der Leyen for Calea Europeană: Europe will never be a purely military alliance. The European Defence Union will always be complementary to NATO

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© European Commission

Conducted by Dan Cărbunaru, edited by Robert Lupițu

NATO is the strongest military Alliance in the world, while Europe will never be a purely military alliance, says Ursula von der Leyen the new President of the European Commission. After her College of Commissioners confirmation vote in the European Parliament, von der Leyen discussed with CaleaEuropeană.ro and other major EU media outlets on the challenges and priorities of the Commission for the next five years.

NATO will always be collective defence, the article 5. Always. Is it the strongest military Alliance in the world and Europe will never be a purely military alliance. That is clear”, said von der Leyen, former German minister of Defence, in a response to a question of CaleaEuropeană.ro‘s director, Dan Cărbunaru, on the Commission’s approach on defence and the relation with NATO considering Macron’s latest statements about the “brain death” of the Atlantic alliance.

On the other hand, von der Leyen suggested that while being complementary to NATO, the European Union has to gain autonomy because of its “unique sets of instruments”.

There are fields where I do not see NATO, but the European Union with its unique sets of instruments – from development cooperation to neighbourhood funds, strong diplomacy and stabilization forces – is needed or called upon. And for that, in crisis or prevention, the European Union has to have functioning structured and procedures. If I look at the defence sector over the last three years, Europa has stepped up impressively by building up the European Defence Union. In order that if the political will is there to act we are able to act. In parenthesis, five years ago in Mali, Europe wanted to do something and was not able. And we have to have the structures and procedures to do so and this is about the European Defence Union” she explained.

Finally, she argued strongly that “the European Defence Union will always be complementary to NATO“.

“Twenty-two member states are also in the alliance of NATO. Or it is smart to be complementary and not redundant, she concluded.

Her remarks, followed by her vision on the relations with US and China, come before the NATO gathering in London, next week, where Donald Trump, Emmanuel Macron, Angela Merkel and the other Euro-atlantic leaders will discuss the future of the Alliance.

As for the relations with US and China, Ursula von der Leyen had a tailored and values based approached.

“For our American friends, I will never forget that we are always sitting on the same side of the table when it comes to transatlantic bonds and shared values. Because our transatlantic friendship it is built of resilience, of personal friendship, cultural exchange, students exchange, business contacts, projects we have together. It is a solid foundation that carried us for many decades and I will cherish it. Of course, we do have tough issues. We are debating with the White House, but knowing how close our ties are, I think it is a good thing to be frank with each other, to negotiate hard, but to never forget we have a common cause”, she said.

“China is challenging us in many ways. I think there are topics where we should be very clear on. From human rights to human security, but there are also topics where we can build a positive agenda. One of them is fight against climate change. China now moving on the direction of working close with those who are fulfilling the Paris Agreement. (…) On 5G,  the Commission has gathered all the main points from the member states and we will come up with a recommendation on how to deal with that topic till the end of the year. I think we will be clear on standards. That should be a common approach in the whole European Union”, she concluded.

 

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